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KOMP Repository (Knockout Mouse Project) KOMP Knock Out Knockout Mouse Mice

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)


Who and what is the KOMP Repository?

The KOMP Repository is the final component of a more than $50 million trans-NIH initiative to increase the availability of genetically altered mice and related materials. The University of California, Davis (UC Davis) and Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI) in Oakland, Calif., are collaborating to preserve, protect, and make available about 8,500 types of knockout mice and related products available to the research community.
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Is the KOMP Repository a company?

No. The KOMP Repository is a publicly-accessible, NIH-funded archive and distribution repository located at the University of California Davis, with a subcontract to the Children’s Hospital of Oakland Research Institute (CHORI).
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What is available from the KOMP Repository?

KOMP products and services are available from the KOMP Repository. The Repository hosts the vectors, ES cells, mice, embryos, and sperm generated by the NIH KOMP Mutagenesis Project. These “products” are generated by two KOMP mutagenesis teams (the CSD consortium and Regeneron Inc). All KOMP products generated by the CSD consortium and Regeneron are available through the KOMP Repository. In addition, the KOMP Repository offers services in support of the KOMP products, including ES cell microinjection, vector cloning, post-insertional modification of cloned ES cells, cryopreservation, assisted reproduction techniques (IVF, ICSI) and mouse breeding, pathology (clinical and anatomical) pathology services, phenotyping services, etc.
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What is a KOMP “product”

A term KOMP “product” combines targeting vectors, ES cell clones, mice, and frozen germplasm generated and derived by the KOMP mutagenesis teams: the CSD consortium and Regeneron, Inc:
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What are the targeting constructs used for making the KOMP products?

The KOMP Repository acquires products from the two KOMP mutagenesis teams, the CSD Consortium (CHORI, Sanger Institute, and UC Davis) and Regeneron. The following are general details of construct design for each of the two production centers.

Regeneron
The entire gene, or as much of the coding sequence as possible, has been deleted in order to ensure a null allele. If ≤ 40 kb, the target gene has been deleted and replaced with a lacZ and loxP-flanked neo cassette. If >40 kb, as many coding exons as possible will be deleted starting with the start codon, preventing the transcription of any RNA that could code for the gene product. If unusually large, contains highly conserved sequences, or has known promoter or enhancer elements, deletion of the first intron has been avoided. The embedded neo gene flanked by loxP sites can be deleted using Cre, in ES cells or mice, to increase expression of the LacZ reporter gene.


CSD
A trapping cassette “SA-βgeo-pA” (splice acceptor-beta-geo-polyA) flanked by Flp-recombinase target “FRT” sites has been inserted within an intron upstream of a critical exon, where it tags the gene with the lacZ reporter, creating a constitutive null mutation in the target gene through efficient splicing to the reporter cassette, resulting in the truncation of the endogenous transcript. Critical coding exons are flanked by Cre-recombinase target “loxP” sites. The reporter-tagged allele can be converted to the lacZ reporter-tagged null (deletion, “Δ”) allele by exposure to Cre recombinase either in ES cells or mice, causing a frame-shift mutation and likely triggering nonsense mediated (NMD) decay of the mutant transcript, thereby ensuring a null allele. Alternatively, the allele can be converted to a wild-type pre-conditional allele by exposure to Flp recombinase, which subsequently can be deleted by Cre.

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Who can obtain products and materials from the KOMP Repository?

The KOMP Repository was established to provide KOMP products to bona fide biomedical researchers. KOMP products are distributed from the KOMP Repository for research purposes only. KOMP products can be obtained by any academic institution, government agency, private not-for-profit reseadrch institution, or commercial for-profit entity engaged in research and development utilizing genetically-altered mice. Therefore, most recipients will be associated with a recognized biomedical or other research institution. When obtaining mice, all recipients are required to conform their research to all applicable statutes and regulations, including all applicable federal statutes and Public Health Service policies relating to the use and care of laboratory animals.
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Can commercial, for-profit entities obtain KOMP products?

Yes. KOMP products are available for distribution to commercial, for-profit entities as well as not-for-profit institutions.
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How can I obtain KOMP products and services?

To obtain KOMP products and services, search first for your gene of interest on the KOMP Repository homepage at www.komp.org. If the search results show “Available for Distribution” click on the link to take you to the ordering page. You can place your order easily online after logging in and creating your account. You’ll also need to sign and submit the KOMP MTA. For more information on ordering KOMP products and services, go the the homepage at www.komp.org and click on the link “Order Products”.

Does the KOMP Repository accept mouse strains donated by individual investigators for archiving and distribution?

Maybe! The KOMP Repository is dedicated to archiving and distribution of vectors, ES cells, mice, embryos, and sperm generated as a result of the NIH KOMP Mutagenesis Project. If you have made mice from ES cells obtained from the KOMP Repository (such as through the NIH KOMP Supplement Program), then we will gladly accept them into the KOMP Repository…contact us at service@komp.org or at 1-888-KOMP-MICE (1-888-566-7642) and we’ll help you to make the necessary arrangements. Otherwise, if you are interested in depositing non-KOMP related vectors, ES cells, and/or mouse lines (live mice or germplasm) for archiving and distribution, you can do so at the Mutant Mouse Regional Resource Center (MMRRC), a publicly-accessible archive and distribution repository funded by the NIH. Call us at 1-530-754-MMRRC (6677) for more details, or go to www.mmrrc.org and click on the “Strain Submission” button which will link to a description and instructions for depositing your mouse line in the MMRRC.
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I’ve made mice from KOMP ES cells. Can I send these mice to the KOMP Repository?

Yes! The KOMP Repository is dedicated to archiving and distribution of vectors, ES cells, mice, embryos, and sperm generated as a result of the NIH KOMP Mutagenesis Project. If you have made mice from ES cells obtained from the KOMP Repository (such as through the NIH KOMP Supplement Program), then we will gladly accept them into the KOMP Repository…contact us at service@komp.org or at 1-888-KOMP-MICE (1-888-566-7642) and we’ll help you to make the necessary arrangements.
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I’ve made genetically altered mice that are unrelated to the KOMP program, and I’d like to make them available for distribution to the biomedical research community. Can I send them to the KOMP Repository?

No. The KOMP Repository is dedicated to archiving and distribution of vectors, ES cells, mice, embryos, and sperm generated as a result of the NIH KOMP Mutagenesis Project. However, you can deposit non-KOMP related vectors, ES cells, and/or mouse lines (live mice or germplasm) in the Mutant Mouse Regional Resource Center (MMRRC), a publicly-accessible archive and distribution repository funded by the NIH. Call us at 1-530-754-MMRRC (6677) for more details, or go to www.mmrrc.org and click on the “Strain Submission” button which will link to a description and instructions for depositing your mouse line in the MMRRC.
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How can I send modifications that I made from the KOMP Materials to another university or non-profit organization (NPO)?

We encourage you to deposit the modifications in the KOMP Repository, and the KOMP Repository will distribute them to requestors. You may also distribute them to other universities and NPOs that also sign a KOMP MTA. Please ensure that the KOMP Repository receives a copy of your organization’s MTA and the KOMP MTA signed by the other university or NPO.
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How can I send KOMP mice and other KOMP products to my collaborator at another university or non-profit organization (NPO)?

You can distribute KOMP mice and other KOMP products to your collaborator at another university or NPO after your collaborator’s organization first signs a KOMP MTA. Please ensure that the KOMP Repository receives a copy of the KOMP MTA signed by the other university or NPO.
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Does the KOMP Repository create new strains for distribution?

No. The KOMP Repository archives and distributes strains developed by the two KOMP mutagenesis teams (CSD consortium and Regeneron, Inc).
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How long does it take for a strain to become available for distribution?

Generally, once an ES cell line is transferred to the KOMP Repository, it will take about 6 weeks before it becomes available for distribution. During this time, a series of quality control tests are applied to the clones to ensure their identity, viability, and pathogen-free status.
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How do I acknowledge use of a KOMP product or service used for a publication?

By obtaining a KOMP product (vector, ES cell, mice, germplasm) or service (e.g.,microinjection) from the KOMP Repository, you agree to acknowledge the NIH KOMP program.
For your convenience you may use the following information in your publications:

The vector, ES cell(s), and/or mouse strain used for this research project was generated by the trans-NIH Knock-Out Mouse Project (KOMP) and obtained from the KOMP Repository (www.komp.org). NIH grants to Velocigene at Regeneron Inc (U01HG004085) and the CSD Consortium (U01HG004080) funded the generation of gene-targeted ES cells for 8500 genes in the KOMP Program and archived and distributed by the KOMP Repository at UC Davis and CHORI (U42RR024244). For more information or to obtain KOMP products go to www.komp.org or email service@komp.org.
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What is an MTA?

The abbreviation stands for Material Transfer Agreement. It is an agreement between a provider and a recipient for transfer of materials. The KOMP Repository uses the KOMP MTA as the formal instrument for transferring KOMP products from the KOMP Repository to researchers. The MTA states the terms and use limitations imposed by the KOMP Program on the recipient of KOMP products.
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Can I alter the terms of the KOMP MTA to address concerns of my institution's technology transfer official?

In 2007,UC Davis worked with CHORI, Regeneron, Sanger, and the NIH to come up with an MTA that hundreds of nonprofit and for profit entities would be able to sign without requiring negotiations and modifications. Since then, we have received hundreds of signed unmodified KOMP MTAs. Custom-written MTAs and alterations to the KOMP MTA would create much confusion and additional administrative burden on the KOMP Repository and other parties in the distribution process, thus impeding the acquisition and distribution of KOMP products for the research community.
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How are KOMP products and services priced?

The KOMP Repository, in coordination with the NIH, adopted a distribution fee structure for products and services obtained from the KOMP Repository. The fees charged to non-profit entities (academic institutions, government agencies, private institutions) cover costs for obtaining the product or service, shipping, and any special handling or procedures requested by the recipient. The fees charged to commercial for-profit entities include these and an addition commercial distribution fee of $15,000 for each product ordered.
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What does the Cryo-recovery Fee cover?

The cryo-recovery fee offsets the costs of thawing embryos and/or sperm in order to resuscitated and recover mice from a cryo-archive and replenishing the depleted material. The requesting investigator will receive the litter recovered. The litter will not be genotyped (unless required to ensure the presence of at least one carrier). At minimum, the litter will contain animals sufficient for one breeder pair or an equivalent number of mice. (For requests for specific genotypes or quantities, the per-mouse distribution fee is charged in addition to the recovery fee.)
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How long does it take to resuscitate a strain from Cryo-recovery?

Recovered litters are usually available to ship in 2 to 3 months after an order is placed and a signed MTA is received.
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Why is the maximum number of mice that can be requested at one time so small?

The KOMP Repository is not a commercial breeding facility and the strains in the repository are not in high enough demand to warrant maintaining a large, live production colony. To assure availability to other interested researchers, the KOMP Repository limits requests to two pair of breeders, leaving the recipient to breed up a colony sufficient for their research needs.
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Can I request more than the numbers specified in the standard availability level?

Yes. Under special arrangement, and for additional costs, the KOMP Repository will supply additional mice to a requesting investigator.
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Is it possible to obtain cryopreserved material from the KOMP Repository instead of live mice?

Yes. The KOMP Repository encourages you to obtain cryopreserved material (ES cells and germplasm) instead of live mice. This will facilitate shipping to and importation into your facility. Often, your facility will impose lengthy quarantine times (8-12 weeks) for importing live mice. Please check with your administrative and veterinary officials to determine what KOMP product format is best for you to order.
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How do I obtain assistance with biological, husbandry, breeding or genotyping questions for a particular strain?

The KOMP Repository provides technical services for all products and services obtained from it. The KOMP Repository Customer Service Center can be contacted at service@komp.org or by phoning toll-free (from North America) 1-888-KOMP-MICE (1-888-566-7642) or by phoning (from outside North America) +1-530-752-KOMP. You may also fax your question to (530) 757-3284.
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My browser cannot access the KOMP website; what's wrong?

There are several possible causes, including browser not being configured to support secure HTTP (HTTPS, using SSL 2.0): SSL 2.0 or higher not configured in your browser. (For help follow this link)
Firewall or Proxy not configured to allow HTTPS / SSL 2.0. (Check with your IT help desk.)
Internet connection problems. (Try again later.)
KOMP’s Application Server temporarily unavailable. (send an email to service@komp.org).
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The KOMP Repository is located at the University of California Davis and Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute. Question? Comments? For Mice, Cells, and germplasm please contact us at service@komp.org, US 1-888-KOMP-MICE or International +1-530-752-KOMP, or for vectors komporders@chori.org or +1-510-450-7917.